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Children’s literature
This paper is about Children’s literature and the topic is any one of the three topics IN HE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW;
These assignments are designed to encourage independent investigation of children’s literature and related issues. Because the quizzes demand a focus on assigned texts, lectures, and class discussions, the papers provide you the opportunity to explore original territory in the field. They also monitor your abilities to formulate questions, topics, and theses of your own; to generate a thoughtful program of investigation and research; and to demonstrate your rhetorical and linguistic skills through the use of evidence and argumentation — all of these valuable critical thinking tools you will need in any professional discipline. Each paper must be 1500 words long (roughly 6 pages double-spaced in 12-point font) and make use of outside resources for purposes of quotation, evidence, and authoritative support. In most cases, that means a bibliography or “Works Cited” list of four to six sources, mostly critical works. You will find advice on how and where to seek acceptable sources on the attached “Starting Points for Research.” Take advantage of it. Take advantage as well of my office hours, which will be expanded on the days indicated on the syllabus. I can help you formulate a topic that will interest you and a good thesis. Further suggestions for writing an “A” paper are appended as “Words for the Wise.”
MIDTERM (Choose one):
1)Analyze a children’s novel from the period between the Golden Age and the Silver Age — roughly 1920 to 1950, when books such as Mary Poppins (Travers), Little House on the Prairie (Wilder), and The Hobbit (Tolkien) made their appearance. This was a time when the primarily educational, even adult-oriented books of the Golden Age were giving way to the more child-friendly works of the latter period. You might consider this question of intended audience and purpose, or take on any issue in the book that has critical support. Examples of past papers: “Wilder’s Little House: Traditional vs. Modern Roles for Women”; “The Hobbit as Mythic Coming-of-Age.”
2)Consider a children’s author from a specific standpoint of theme, subject matter, or reception; this can be an author we are reading, as long as you don’t simply echo what we discuss in class. Examples: “Lewis’s Christian Writings and Narnia,” “Human Nature in the Novels of Roald Dahl.”
3)Select a children’s novel from the Silver Age (1950-1970) and argue a specific thesis about it. Make certain you are dealing with a children’s book (for readers no older than 12); Catcher in the Rye and Lord of the Flies, for instance, are definitely adolescent novels and thus outside this course (save them for LTWL 116). If you are not sure, ask. Examples: “Harriet the Spy, Proto-Feminist”; “Rationalizing Fantasy in The Rats of NIMH.”
These assignments are designed to encourage independent investigation of children’s literature and related issues. Because the quizzes demand a focus on assigned texts, lectures, and class discussions, the papers provide you the opportunity to explore original territory in the field. They also monitor your abilities to formulate questions, topics, and theses of your own; to generate a thoughtful program of investigation and research; and to demonstrate your rhetorical and linguistic skills through the use of evidence and argumentation — all of these valuable critical thinking tools you will need in any professional discipline.
Each paper must be 1500 words long (roughly 6 pages double-spaced in 12-point font) and make use of outside resources for purposes of quotation, evidence, and authoritative support. In most cases, that means a bibliography or “Works Cited” list of four to six sources, mostly critical works. You will find advice on how and where to seek acceptable sources on the attached “Starting Points for Research.” Take advantage of it. Take advantage as well of my office hours, which will be expanded on the days indicated on the syllabus. I can help you formulate a topic that will interest you and a good thesis. Further suggestions for writing an “A” paper are appended as “Words for the Wise.”
MIDTERM (Choose one):
1. Analyze a children’s novel from the period between the Golden Age and the Silver Age — roughly 1920 to 1950, when books such as Mary Poppins (Travers), Little House on the Prairie (Wilder), and The Hobbit (Tolkien) made their appearance. This was a time when the primarily educational, even adult-oriented books of the Golden Age were giving way to the more child-friendly works of the latter period. You might consider this question of intended audience and purpose, or take on any issue in the book that has critical support. Examples of past papers: “Wilder’s Little House: Traditional vs. Modern Roles for Women”; “The Hobbit as Mythic Coming-of-Age.”
2. Consider a children’s author from a specific standpoint of theme, subject matter, or reception; this can be an author we are reading, as long as you don’t simply echo what we discuss in class. Examples: “Lewis’s Christian Writings and Narnia,” “Human Nature in the Novels of Roald Dahl.”
3. Select a children’s novel from the Silver Age (1950-1970) and argue a specific thesis about it. Make certain you are dealing with a children’s book (for readers no older than 12); Catcher in the Rye and Lord of the Flies, for instance, are definitely adolescent novels and thus outside this course (save them for LTWL 116). If you are not sure, ask. Examples: “Harriet the Spy, Proto-Feminist”; “Rationalizing Fantasy in The Rats of NIMH.”
STARTING POINTS FOR RESEARCH
In the age of the Internet, an increasing number of students have come to believe that “research” means Googling for half an hour. While there are now more excellent resources than ever online, you need to know how to find them or evaluate their usefulness. Besides, as students at UCSD, you are paying a lot for your education, some of which goes to support a superb library/research system on campus. Get your money’s worth: take advantage of this university’s facilities and its reputation for higher learning. As UCSD students, in fact, you may even access much of the university’s library and online resources from the comfort of your own home.
Not all research materials, whether in print or in photons, are created equal. For example, Cliff Notes, SparkNotes, and their equivalent are for high school students who haven’t done the reading, not for college students supporting critical arguments. Likewise, most general encyclopedias are so secondary school. That includes Wikipedia, which is simply an online encyclopedia; it may be useful for background and ideas, but it is not a quotable resource; at best it can point you to quotable resources. Instead, begin by turning to the many excellent reference works or databases available through the library website. Fortunately, UCSD offers access to many electronic journals and other potential research materials alongside the non-virtual books and periodicals in the library building itself.
Despite the many useful online sources, books and articles in print have information that is not available online. Use research in many media; anything else will look like intellectual laziness.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS TOPIC GO TO

Children’s literature

This paper is about Children’s literature and the topic is any one of the three topics IN HE INSTRUCTIONS BELOW;
These assignments are designed to encourage independent investigation of children’s literature and related issues. Because the quizzes demand a focus on assigned texts, lectures, and class discussions, the papers provide you the opportunity to explore original territory in the field. They also monitor your abilities to formulate questions, topics, and theses of your own; to generate a thoughtful program of investigation and research; and to demonstrate your rhetorical and linguistic skills through the use of evidence and argumentation — all of these valuable critical thinking tools you will need in any professional discipline. Each paper must be 1500 words long (roughly 6 pages double-spaced in 12-point font) and make use of outside resources for purposes of quotation, evidence, and authoritative support. In most cases, that means a bibliography or “Works Cited” list of four to six sources, mostly critical works. You will find advice on how and where to seek acceptable sources on the attached “Starting Points for Research.” Take advantage of it. Take advantage as well of my office hours, which will be expanded on the days indicated on the syllabus. I can help you formulate a topic that will interest you and a good thesis. Further suggestions for writing an “A” paper are appended as “Words for the Wise.”
MIDTERM (Choose one):
1)Analyze a children’s novel from the period between the Golden Age and the Silver Age — roughly 1920 to 1950, when books such as Mary Poppins (Travers), Little House on the Prairie (Wilder), and The Hobbit (Tolkien) made their appearance. This was a time when the primarily educational, even adult-oriented books of the Golden Age were giving way to the more child-friendly works of the latter period. You might consider this question of intended audience and purpose, or take on any issue in the book that has critical support. Examples of past papers: “Wilder’s Little House: Traditional vs. Modern Roles for Women”; “The Hobbit as Mythic Coming-of-Age.”
2)Consider a children’s author from a specific standpoint of theme, subject matter, or reception; this can be an author we are reading, as long as you don’t simply echo what we discuss in class. Examples: “Lewis’s Christian Writings and Narnia,” “Human Nature in the Novels of Roald Dahl.”
3)Select a children’s novel from the Silver Age (1950-1970) and argue a specific thesis about it. Make certain you are dealing with a children’s book (for readers no older than 12); Catcher in the Rye and Lord of the Flies, for instance, are definitely adolescent novels and thus outside this course (save them for LTWL 116). If you are not sure, ask. Examples: “Harriet the Spy, Proto-Feminist”; “Rationalizing Fantasy in The Rats of NIMH.”
These assignments are designed to encourage independent investigation of children’s literature and related issues. Because the quizzes demand a focus on assigned texts, lectures, and class discussions, the papers provide you the opportunity to explore original territory in the field. They also monitor your abilities to formulate questions, topics, and theses of your own; to generate a thoughtful program of investigation and research; and to demonstrate your rhetorical and linguistic skills through the use of evidence and argumentation — all of these valuable critical thinking tools you will need in any professional discipline.
Each paper must be 1500 words long (roughly 6 pages double-spaced in 12-point font) and make use of outside resources for purposes of quotation, evidence, and authoritative support. In most cases, that means a bibliography or “Works Cited” list of four to six sources, mostly critical works. You will find advice on how and where to seek acceptable sources on the attached “Starting Points for Research.” Take advantage of it. Take advantage as well of my office hours, which will be expanded on the days indicated on the syllabus. I can help you formulate a topic that will interest you and a good thesis. Further suggestions for writing an “A” paper are appended as “Words for the Wise.”
MIDTERM (Choose one):
1. Analyze a children’s novel from the period between the Golden Age and the Silver Age — roughly 1920 to 1950, when books such as Mary Poppins (Travers), Little House on the Prairie (Wilder), and The Hobbit (Tolkien) made their appearance. This was a time when the primarily educational, even adult-oriented books of the Golden Age were giving way to the more child-friendly works of the latter period. You might consider this question of intended audience and purpose, or take on any issue in the book that has critical support. Examples of past papers: “Wilder’s Little House: Traditional vs. Modern Roles for Women”; “The Hobbit as Mythic Coming-of-Age.”
2. Consider a children’s author from a specific standpoint of theme, subject matter, or reception; this can be an author we are reading, as long as you don’t simply echo what we discuss in class. Examples: “Lewis’s Christian Writings and Narnia,” “Human Nature in the Novels of Roald Dahl.”
3. Select a children’s novel from the Silver Age (1950-1970) and argue a specific thesis about it. Make certain you are dealing with a children’s book (for readers no older than 12); Catcher in the Rye and Lord of the Flies, for instance, are definitely adolescent novels and thus outside this course (save them for LTWL 116). If you are not sure, ask. Examples: “Harriet the Spy, Proto-Feminist”; “Rationalizing Fantasy in The Rats of NIMH.”
STARTING POINTS FOR RESEARCH
In the age of the Internet, an increasing number of students have come to believe that “research” means Googling for half an hour. While there are now more excellent resources than ever online, you need to know how to find them or evaluate their usefulness. Besides, as students at UCSD, you are paying a lot for your education, some of which goes to support a superb library/research system on campus. Get your money’s worth: take advantage of this university’s facilities and its reputation for higher learning. As UCSD students, in fact, you may even access much of the university’s library and online resources from the comfort of your own home.
Not all research materials, whether in print or in photons, are created equal. For example, Cliff Notes, SparkNotes, and their equivalent are for high school students who haven’t done the reading, not for college students supporting critical arguments. Likewise, most general encyclopedias are so secondary school. That includes Wikipedia, which is simply an online encyclopedia; it may be useful for background and ideas, but it is not a quotable resource; at best it can point you to quotable resources. Instead, begin by turning to the many excellent reference works or databases available through the library website. Fortunately, UCSD offers access to many electronic journals and other potential research materials alongside the non-virtual books and periodicals in the library building itself.
Despite the many useful online sources, books and articles in print have information that is not available online. Use research in many media; anything else will look like intellectual laziness.

FOR MORE INFORMATION ON THIS TOPIC GO TO

Interested in a PLAGIARISM-FREE paper based on these particular instructions?...with 100% confidentiality?

Order Now