Unit name: Identify legal and ethical requirements of property management to complete agency work Unit Code: CPPDSM4007A Event 1: Written assignment (14 Questions) 1. List ten specific duties of the Property Management department in a real estate agency. 2. List one government agency (not the Office of Fair Trading) concerned with tenancy regulation and describe its role. 3. List four types of tenancies and give a description of each and the legislation that affects this tenancy. 4. List three issues a landlord may have with a tenant & two issues that a tenant may have with a landlord. Discuss how these issues can be avoided. 5. You own a rental property and your real estate agency charges a property management fee of 8.8% including GST on the weekly rental of $300, calculate the weekly fee for the agency. 6. Describe two key register systems and explain why these systems are essential in agency practice. 7 Briefly describe the property manager’s roles, obligations and responsibilities in relation to the following tasks: a) Property manager supervisors role and prospecting for new properties/landlords b) Initiating a new managing agency agreement c) Assessing tenancy applications d) Entering into a residential tenancy agreement with a tenant e) Inspecting and maintaining leased residential properties f) Terminating leases 8 Outline the process for receiving, recording, lodging & releasing: a) Rental bonds b) Rents received including financial statements to landlords 9 Property management is considered the most important asset of a real estate agency. Why? 10 Name the current statute that regulates residential tenancies in NSW and why was it introduced? 11 A prospective tenant walks into a real estate office asking about units available for rent in the area. The person is dressed in the national dress of their country of origin. The property officer is put off by the person’s appearance and informs them that nothing suitable is available at that time, although in fact he has several properties on the books. The prospective tenant having seen several properties advertised for rent by the agency has taken offence to the agents’ attitude and questioned the availability of these properties. -Discuss the legislative requirements when selecting tenants. -Discuss how the agent will handle the prospective tenants’ complaint. -What procedures regarding a rental enquiry should the agent have followed? 12. Discuss the issue of the Property Management department giving keys to prospective tenants to inspect properties unaccompanied. What are the ethical, legislative and risk management issues and the pros and cons of this practice. 13 Distinguish the differences in the purpose of trust funds and administrative funds. 14 The Real Estate Industry Award 2010 has established Three (3) job classifications for property management. List and describe each of these new classifications.

Unit name: Identify legal and ethical requirements of property management to complete agency work

Unit Code: CPPDSM4007A

Event 1: Written assignment (14 Questions)

1. List ten specific duties of the Property Management department in a real estate agency.

2. List one government agency (not the Office of Fair Trading) concerned with tenancy regulation and describe its role.

3. List four types of tenancies and give a description of each and the legislation that affects this tenancy.

4. List three issues a landlord may have with a tenant & two issues that a tenant may have with a landlord. Discuss how these issues can be avoided.

5. You own a rental property and your real estate agency charges a property management fee of 8.8% including GST on the weekly rental of $300, calculate the weekly fee for the agency.

6. Describe two key register systems and explain why these systems are essential in agency practice.

7     Briefly describe the property manager’s roles, obligations and responsibilities in relation to the following tasks:

a) Property manager supervisors role and prospecting for new properties/landlords

b) Initiating a new managing agency agreement

c) Assessing tenancy applications

d) Entering into a residential tenancy agreement with a tenant

e) Inspecting and maintaining leased residential properties

f) Terminating leases

8         Outline the process for receiving, recording, lodging & releasing:

a) Rental bonds

b) Rents received including financial statements to landlords

9      Property management is considered the most important asset of a real estate agency. Why?

10      Name the current statute that regulates residential tenancies in NSW and why was it introduced?

 

11      A prospective tenant walks into a real estate office asking about units available for rent in the area. The person is dressed in the national dress of their country of origin. The property officer is put off by the person’s appearance and informs them that nothing suitable is available at that time, although in fact he has several properties on the books.

The prospective tenant having seen several properties advertised for rent by the agency has taken offence to the agents’ attitude and questioned the availability of these properties.

-Discuss the legislative requirements when selecting tenants.

-Discuss how the agent will handle the prospective tenants’ complaint.

-What procedures regarding a rental enquiry should the agent have followed?

12. Discuss the issue of the Property Management department giving keys to prospective tenants to inspect properties unaccompanied. What are the ethical, legislative and risk management issues and the pros and cons of this practice.

13    Distinguish the differences in the purpose of trust funds and administrative funds.

14   The Real Estate Industry Award 2010 has established Three (3) job classifications for property management. List and describe each of these new classifications.

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Advertising Questions Part A: Answer each of the following questions in a composition of one or two paragraphs. 1. You’re an account executive who has received job offers from a full‐service agency, a creative boutique, and an interactive agency. Describe the differences among these types of agencies. 2. You’re an account manager who plans to use the objective‐and‐task budgetary method. Explain the steps you’ll take in doing this, and justify your reasons for selecting this approach. 3. Several governmental agencies are responsible for regulating advertising. Examine the duties and powers of three of these agencies. Part B: Answer each of the following questions in two to five sentences. 1. The objective of your advertising campaign is to persuade the consumer to purchase a product. Choose four advertising methods to achieve this goal. 2. What is a click‐through? How frequent is the click‐through rate? 3. You’re a sales representative for a sporting goods manufacturer. Compare the push strategies of point‐of‐purchase displays and incentives. 4. Distinguish between the offset lithography and plateless printing processes. As the art director of a newspaper ad, which of these processes would you use and why? 5. What advertising techniques are used to reach (a) members of business organizations and (b) governmental employees? 6. Your advertising agency represents a fast‐food chain. You’re asked to complete a competitor analysis and an industry analysis for the advertising plan. What type of data will you get from each analysis? 7. A company wishes to improve its corporate image through advertising. Explain the differences between an advocacy ad campaign and a cause‐related ad campaign. 8. Contrast the goal of primary demand stimulation with that of selective demand stimulation. 9. Choose one barrier to successful international advertising and describe one way advertisers can overcome it. 10. Explain the difference between the pan and truck camera techniques. Notes: Questions based on the following text:  Advertising and Integrated Brand Promotion, 5th Edition o Thomas O’Guinn, Chris Allen, and Richard J. Semenik o ISBN‐10: 0324568622 / ISBN‐13: 9780324568622 o Published in 2009

Advertising Questions
Part A: Answer each of the following questions in a composition of one or two paragraphs.
1. You’re an account executive who has received job offers from a full‐service agency, a creative
boutique, and an interactive agency. Describe the differences among these types of agencies.
2. You’re an account manager who plans to use the objective‐and‐task budgetary method. Explain
the steps you’ll take in doing this, and justify your reasons for selecting this approach.
3. Several governmental agencies are responsible for regulating advertising. Examine the duties
and powers of three of these agencies.
Part B: Answer each of the following questions in two to five sentences.
1. The objective of your advertising campaign is to persuade the consumer to purchase a product.
Choose four advertising methods to achieve this goal.
2. What is a click‐through? How frequent is the click‐through rate?
3. You’re a sales representative for a sporting goods manufacturer. Compare the push strategies of
point‐of‐purchase displays and incentives.
4. Distinguish between the offset lithography and plateless printing processes. As the art director
of a newspaper ad, which of these processes would you use and why?
5. What advertising techniques are used to reach (a) members of business organizations and (b)
governmental employees?
6. Your advertising agency represents a fast‐food chain. You’re asked to complete a competitor
analysis and an industry analysis for the advertising plan. What type of data will you get from
each analysis?
7. A company wishes to improve its corporate image through advertising. Explain the differences
between an advocacy ad campaign and a cause‐related ad campaign.
8. Contrast the goal of primary demand stimulation with that of selective demand stimulation.
9. Choose one barrier to successful international advertising and describe one way advertisers can
overcome it.
10. Explain the difference between the pan and truck camera techniques.
Notes:
Questions based on the following text:
 Advertising and Integrated Brand Promotion, 5th Edition
o Thomas O’Guinn, Chris Allen, and Richard J. Semenik
o ISBN‐10: 0324568622 / ISBN‐13: 9780324568622
o Published in 2009

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seco¢ò d Exam Reli¦Å ious studies101¡®¡®EÊ¥plori¢ò¦Å ReliºÚion¡¯ ¡¯March189¢Ä 14 Ide¢òti¢òcations:Deflne10terms or peopIe and tell me three thi¢» gs:1¡£Who or what the ter¢ò 1or perso¢ò is¡£2¡£Where the ter¢ò1or perso¢ò was used i¢ò ou’course3¡£Why they or it matter to ReliÀí;io¢ò h Amenca¡£¡¾sO poi¢òts) Lomie FAsbee Civ¢ò Rehgion Unhaoanism Ame IIutchinson D¢¶sm John Nelson Darby Ani¢òlisIn FundaFnenta¢» s1n George Wh¢»eÇðeld Cyrt1s scoÇðeld Thc Refo¢ò.Iation Brucc Barton Pu´Ãans John W`nthrop Wi11iam Jermings Bryan Charles Briggs Great Awakening Isaac¡¦ ¦©ayer WÇße Lar¦Ã NoIIIIan 1.Complete f1ve ofthe se¢òtences a¢òd2¡£Give a short answer as to why the lecture, readhg or ¢òlm síÇd this was importa¢ò t¡Ã ¡°Op¢¶nts) 1.Abräªam Lincoln¡¯ stum toward sp1ritual¡± and a determinationáìat God wanted ¢òáð to frec the slaves resultedì¯omÎée presswes ofthe war,the dcath of”sson and a áìat he read ovcr and over¡£ 2.The Rehgious impulse of a secular po¢» tioa1inst¢» ution is Ga11ed . 3.The minister from England identifled with the Great Awakening was ¿Ú 4.Thc cx Confederate so1&¡Ø who created a Dopensational¡° t biblc lF1entioned in the artic1c On Fundäªenta¢» sm¡¢vas ¡£ 5.The nßµer more adaptable fom ofJud¸×sm broughtto Amer¡æ a in the19Çúcentury by IsaaG Mayer Wise is called 6.Accorɽng to stephen Prothero Îéc Bib1e he felt were nottruc¡£ used a razor knife to cut out the parts of 7.%e woman who was banned¡¿1o¢ò1Puritan¢±Òùassachusetts for encowaging people to have a rclationsh¢ò dre¢¶ly wiÎéGod was 8.Thc re¿§aliòµminister whoâ»aveled thc¡Þ un¡± and inspired BßÓäªin Franklin to leave his rnoncy at home was ¡£ Describe three of the foIlowi¢ò g¡£List the0ompo¢ò e¢»ts we spoke aboutin dass for each one¡£CsO p¢¶nts) 1.What speciÇðcally are thc four c¡¯ s ofAmeocan c¢±×¢l Religion?(Describe them spcof1Gally) 2.What are the fo”necessary strands for Christian hndamentalismѪentioncd in lecture and thc Onhne article? 3.Name thc¡êol¡¿r rnain rn¢òlennial ¢õiews talked about in class and in thc postedÄÍG1c¡£ 4.h American Jesus,Proáìero rnakes a back to baGk contrast between thc chapter ca11ed sweet savior and Manly Redecmer¡£What is the Gentral re¢» gious GOnnict betw¡£en those ¡°¢ôo ch¡£pters¡¤

seco¢ò d Exam Reli¦Å ious studies101¡®¡®EÊ¥plori¢ò¦Å ReliºÚion¡¯
¡¯March189¢Ä 14
Ide¢òti¢òcations:Deflne10terms or peopIe and tell me three thi¢» gs:1¡£Who or what
the ter¢ò 1or perso¢ò is¡£2¡£Where the ter¢ò1or perso¢ò was used i¢ò ou’course3¡£Why
they or it matter to ReliÀí;io¢ò h Amenca¡£¡¾sO poi¢òts)
Lomie FAsbee Civ¢ò Rehgion
Unhaoanism Ame IIutchinson
D¢¶sm John Nelson Darby
Ani¢òlisIn FundaFnenta¢» s1n
George Wh¢»eÇðeld Cyrt1s scoÇðeld
Thc Refo¢ò.Iation Brucc Barton
Pu´Ãans John W`nthrop
Wi11iam Jermings Bryan Charles Briggs
Great Awakening Isaac¡¦ ¦©ayer WÇße
Lar¦Ã NoIIIIan
1.Complete f1ve ofthe se¢òtences a¢òd2¡£Give a short answer as to why the lecture,
readhg or ¢òlm síÇd this was importa¢ò t¡Ã ¡°Op¢¶nts)
1.Abräªam Lincoln¡¯ stum toward sp1ritual¡± and a determinationáìat God wanted ¢òáð
to frec the slaves resultedì¯omÎée presswes ofthe war,the dcath of”sson and a
áìat he read ovcr and over¡£
2.The Rehgious impulse of a secular po¢» tioa1inst¢» ution is Ga11ed .
3.The minister from England identifled with the Great Awakening was ¿Ú
4.Thc cx Confederate so1&¡Ø who created a Dopensational¡° t biblc lF1entioned in the
artic1c On Fundäªenta¢» sm¡¢vas ¡£
5.The nßµer more adaptable fom ofJud¸×sm broughtto Amer¡æ a in the19Çúcentury by
IsaaG Mayer Wise is called
6.Accorɽng to stephen Prothero
Îéc Bib1e he felt were nottruc¡£
used a razor knife to cut out the parts of
7.%e woman who was banned¡¿1o¢ò1Puritan¢±Òùassachusetts for encowaging people to
have a rclationsh¢ò dre¢¶ly wiÎéGod was
8.Thc re¿§aliòµminister whoâ»aveled thc¡Þ un¡± and inspired BßÓäªin Franklin to
leave his rnoncy at home was ¡£
Describe three of the foIlowi¢ò g¡£List the0ompo¢ò e¢»ts we spoke aboutin dass for
each one¡£CsO p¢¶nts)
1.What speciÇðcally are thc four c¡¯ s ofAmeocan c¢±×¢l Religion?(Describe them
spcof1Gally)
2.What are the fo”necessary strands for Christian hndamentalismѪentioncd in lecture
and thc Onhne article?
3.Name thc¡êol¡¿r rnain rn¢òlennial ¢õiews talked about in class and in thc postedÄÍG1c¡£
4.h American Jesus,Proáìero rnakes a back to baGk contrast between thc chapter ca11ed
sweet savior and Manly Redecmer¡£What is the Gentral re¢» gious GOnnict betw¡£en those
¡°¢ôo ch¡£pters¡¤

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Grading Breakdown for Major Essay for Impacts of Science and Technology on Society: The essay is graded out of 35 possible marks. Please find below a rough guideline of the grading criteria that will be used to evaluate your paper. Please submit papers electronically in the bin created for this purpose on the course website. Papers submitted after 11:59pm on Monday, March 24th will be docked grades accordingly (5% per business day—please refer to syllabus pg. 2 for more details). Content: (20 points) Quality of discussion (20 points) *Topic/subject/thesis is very clearly stated in the Introductory paragraph (3 points) *Maintains appropriate focus on the topic throughout the paper *Arguments and ideas unfold in a logical manner *Arguments are substantiated both with adequate discussion and adequate (and appropriate) sources from secondary materials (peer-reviewed only) -Does not bring in unrelated or unexplained/unsubstantiated points *Conclusions and argument(s) follow from presented idea(s); does not make logical ‘leaps’ from ideas to conclusion or between ideas *Adequate engagement/depth with topic -Does not provide simple/unacceptable distinctions/explanations/development of main or secondary arguments *Consists of specific, developed details (not simply an inadequate or improperly developed ‘list’ of reasons pointing to a conclusion) *Maintains clear focus on topic/thesis/subject throughout -Does not branch off into hazy or unrelated comments *Expresses clear engagement/connection with original thesis *Does not make major assumptions or dismissals of alternate views without logical evidence *Does not simply regurgitate quotes in order to prove premises but engages topic on a mature level Style (10 points) Spelling/grammar/punctuation (5 points) *No spelling mistakes *No grammatical/punctuation/copy editing errors—(will be deducted as they occur) Clarity (5 points) *Flow and written expression exhibits balance, clarity and style *Prose exhibits mature, university-level language skills and expression of ideas *Although personal pronouns are acceptable, does not rely too much on personal observation (without adequate substantiation) to prove/legitimize premises *Ideas presented are appropriately focused and avoids vague or generalizing or stereotyping or inconsistent or unintelligible or needlessly technical/verbose gibberish *Gets to the point in a clear and concise way without resorting to the stuff mentioned in the previous point Structure (5 points) Length/Structure/Referencing/Bibliography (5 points) *Paper must include adequate Bibliography that sets out any sources that have been used (including textbook, lecture notes, etc…) *Makes use of adequate sources -No lecture notes -Must be peer-reviewed sources (articles or books) -Dictionaries or Encyclopedias are NOT used as substantial sources *Where sources are used, they MUST be adequately referenced and the paper must include a Bibliography -Any consistent, major referencing model will suffice—APA, MLA, Turabian, etc… -Consistency of model is imperative throughout *No more than 2,100 words and no less than 1800 words or marks will be deducted *organized into clear paragraphs that follow logical progression

Grading Breakdown for Major Essay for Impacts of Science and Technology on Society:

 

The essay is graded out of 35 possible marks

Please find below a rough guideline of the grading criteria that will be used to evaluate your paper.

Please submit papers electronically in the bin created for this purpose on the course website. 

Papers submitted after 11:59pm on Monday, March 24th will be docked grades accordingly (5% per business day—please refer to syllabus pg. 2 for more details).

 

Content: (20 points)

 

Quality of discussion (20 points)

*Topic/subject/thesis is very clearly stated in the Introductory paragraph (3 points)

*Maintains appropriate focus on the topic throughout the paper

*Arguments and ideas unfold in a logical manner

*Arguments are substantiated both with adequate discussion and adequate (and appropriate) sources from secondary materials (peer-reviewed only)

-Does not bring in unrelated or unexplained/unsubstantiated points

*Conclusions and argument(s) follow from presented idea(s); does not make logical ‘leaps’ from ideas to conclusion or between ideas

*Adequate engagement/depth with topic

-Does not provide simple/unacceptable distinctions/explanations/development of main or secondary arguments

*Consists of specific, developed details (not simply an inadequate or improperly developed ‘list’ of reasons pointing to a conclusion)

*Maintains clear focus on topic/thesis/subject throughout

-Does not branch off into hazy or unrelated comments

*Expresses clear engagement/connection with original thesis

*Does not make major assumptions or dismissals of alternate views without logical evidence

*Does not simply regurgitate quotes in order to prove premises but engages topic on a mature level

 

 

Style (10 points)

 

Spelling/grammar/punctuation (5 points)

*No spelling mistakes

*No grammatical/punctuation/copy editing errors—(will be deducted as they occur)

 

Clarity (5 points)

 

*Flow and written expression exhibits balance, clarity and style

*Prose exhibits mature, university-level language skills and expression of ideas

*Although personal pronouns are acceptable, does not rely too much on personal observation (without adequate substantiation) to prove/legitimize premises

*Ideas presented are appropriately focused and avoids vague or generalizing or stereotyping or inconsistent or unintelligible or needlessly technical/verbose gibberish

*Gets to the point in a clear and concise way without resorting to the stuff mentioned in the previous point

 

 

Structure (5 points)

 

Length/Structure/Referencing/Bibliography (5 points)

*Paper must include adequate Bibliography that sets out any sources that have been used (including textbook, lecture notes, etc…)

*Makes use of adequate sources

-No lecture notes

-Must be peer-reviewed sources (articles or books)

-Dictionaries or Encyclopedias are NOT used as substantial sources

*Where sources are used, they MUST be adequately referenced and the paper must include a Bibliography

-Any consistent, major referencing model will suffice—APA, MLA, Turabian, etc…

-Consistency of model is imperative throughout

*No more than 2,100 words and no less than 1800 words or marks will be deducted

*organized into clear paragraphs that follow logical progression

 

 

 

 

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• Informal Evaluation Tools Assignment Informal Evaluation Tools 1-Design an informal evaluation tool to describe a specific skill such as (reading fluency, math fluency or spelling). I would like to choose reading fluency for first grade. 2- Description of the skill to be measured. Briefly describe the skill or content for which you will be developing this tool to measure progress. I will compare this with the items to be sure you have a clear focus for the evaluation tool. 3- Development of clear instructions for student completing the evaluation and for the teacher giving the evaluation. 4- Development of items that directly measure the identified skill. Be sure they are clear, to the point, and unbiased. 5- Accommodations that can be made for students with various disabilities (e.g., limited vision, reading difficulties, attention problems, etc.) 1. Scoring procedures Points Requirements 20 points Meets all requirements stated above with high level of accuracy and consistency 19-15 Meets all requirements stated above but lacks some accuracy and consistency 14-10 Meets most requirements stated above but is accurate and consistent 9-0 Meets few requirements stated above and lacks some accuracy and consistency

  • Informal Evaluation Tools Assignment

Informal Evaluation Tools

1-Design an informal evaluation tool to describe a specific skill such as (reading fluency, math fluency or spelling). I would like to choose reading fluency for first grade.

2- Description of the skill to be measured. Briefly describe the skill or content for which you will be developing this tool to measure progress. I will compare this with the items to be sure you have a clear focus for the evaluation tool.

3- Development of clear instructions for student completing the evaluation and for the teacher giving the evaluation.

4- Development of items that directly measure the identified skill. Be sure they are clear, to the point, and unbiased.

5- Accommodations that can be made for students with various disabilities (e.g., limited vision, reading difficulties, attention problems, etc.)

  1. Scoring procedures

Points

Requirements

20 points

Meets all requirements stated above with high level of accuracy and consistency

19-15

Meets all requirements stated above but lacks some accuracy and consistency

14-10

Meets most requirements stated above but is accurate and consistent

9-0

Meets few requirements stated above and lacks some accuracy and consistency

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ECOS3003 Problem set 1 of 3 Problem set ECOS3003 Due date 14.00 Tuesday 1 April Please keep your answers brief and concise. Excessively long and irrelevant answers will be penalised. 1. Considered the following market. Chrome can choose when launching its new product either to do it LARGE or as NICHE. After Chrome has chosen its action, Firefox observes Chrome¡¦s choice and then can choose to ADAPT to RETAIN its own product. After Firefox has chosen its action, the game ends and the payoffs are made. The payoffs are as follows. If Chrome chooses LARGE and Firefox ADAPT, the payoffs are 25 and 40 to Chrome and Firefox, respectively. If Chrome goes LARGE and Firefox RETAINS the payoffs are 30 and 50 to Chrome and Firefox. If Chrome plays NICHE and Firefox ADAPTS, the payoffs are (40 Chrome, 30 Firefox) and if Chrome plays NICHE and Firefox RETAINS the payoffs are (20, 20) for Chrome and Firefox, respectively. a. What is a Nash equilibrium? Outline the Nash equilibrium or equilibria in the game, and explain your answer. b. What is a subgame perfect equilibrium and how would you find such an equilibrium? What is outcome in the the subgame perfect equilibrium in this game? Explain your answer. c. Does the subgame perfect equilibrium equilibrium result in the outcome that maximises total surplus? If it is, explain why. If not, is there any way the surplusmaximising outcome can be obtained? Interpret your answer in the context of the Coase Theorem. Why might your solution not work? 2. Two workers (workers 1 and 2) on a production line both have the choice to come to work Late or Early. If both come Late their payoffs are 5 and 4 to worker 1 and 2, respectively. If worker 1 comes Late and worker 2 comes Early the payoffs are 2 to each worker. If worker 1 comes Early and 2 comes Late the payoffs are 1 to each of them. Finally, if both workers come Early the payoffs are 3 to each worker. Draw the normal form of this game and determine all of the Nash equilibria. Do you think this game could represent a true production process? 3. Consider the following delegation versus centralisation model of decision making, loosely based on some of the discussion in class. A principal wishes to implement a decision that has to be a number between 0 and 1; that is, a decision d needs to be implemented where 0 „T d „T1. The difficulty for the principal is that she does not know what decision is appropriate given the current state of the economy, but she would like to implement a decision that exactly equals what ECOS3003 Problem set 2 of 3 is required given the state of the economy. In other words, if the economy is in state s (where 0 „T s „T1) the principal would like to implement a decision d = s as the principal¡¦s utility Up (or loss from the maximum possible profit) is given by P U ƒ­ ƒ{ s ƒ{ d . With such a utility function, maximising utility really means making the loss as small as possible. For simplicity, the two possible levels of s are 0.4 and 0.7, and each occurs with probability 0.5. There are two division managers A and B who each have their own biases. Manager A always wants a decision of 0.4 to be implemented, and incurs a disutility UA that is increasing the further from 0.4 the decision d that is actually implement, specifically, 0.4 A U ƒ­ ƒ{ ƒ{ d . Similarly, Manager B always wants a decision of 0.7 to be implement, and incurs a disutility UB that is (linearly) increasing in the distance between 0.7 and the actually decision that is implemented – that is 0.7 B U ƒ­ ƒ{ ƒ{ d . Each manager is completely informed, so that each of them knows exactly what the state of the economy s is. (a) The principal can opt to centralise the decision but before making her decision ¡V given she does not know what the state of the economy is ¡V she asks for recommendations from her two division managers. Centralisation means that the principal commits to implement a decision that is the average of the two recommendations she received from her managers. The recommendations are sent simultaneously and cannot be less than 0 or greater than 1. Assume that the state of the economy s = 0.7. What is the report (or recommendation) that Manager A will send if Manager B always truthfully reports s? (b) Again the principal is going to centralise the decision and will ask for a recommendation from both managers, as in the previous question. Now, however, assume that both managers strategically make their recommendations. What are the recommendations rA and rB made by the Managers A and B, respectively, in a Nash equilibrium? (c) What is the principal¡¦s expected utility (or loss) under centralised decision making (as in part b)? (d) Can you design a contract for both of the managers that can help the principal implement their preferred option? Why might this contract be problematic in the real world? 4. Consider a variant on the Aghion and Tirole (1997) model. Poppy, the principal, and Aiden, the agent, together can decide on implementing a new project, but both are unsure of which project is good and which is really bad. Given this, if no one is informed they will not do any project and both parties get zero. Both Poppy and Aiden can, however, put effort into discovering a good project. Poppy can put in effort E; this costs her effort cost 1 2 2 E , but it gives her a probability of being ECOS3003 Problem set 3 of 3 informed of E. If Poppy gets her preferred project she will get a payoff of $1. For all other projects Poppy gets zero. Similarly, the agent Aiden can put in effort e at a cost of 1 2 2 e ; this gives Aiden a probability of being informed with probability e. If Aiden gets his preferred project he gets $1. For all other projects he gets zero. Note also, that the probability that Poppy¡¦s preferred project is also Aiden¡¦s preferred project is £\ (this is the degree of congruence is £\). It is also the case that £\ if Aiden chooses his preferred project that it will also be the preferred project of Poppy. (Note, in this question, we assume that £\ = £] from the standard model studied in class.) (a) Assume that Poppy has the legal right to decide (P-formal authority). If Poppy is uninformed she will ask the agent for a recommendation; if Aiden is informed he will recommend a project to implement. First consider the case when both Aiden and Poppy simultaneously choose their effort costs. Write out the utility or profit function for both Poppy and Aiden. Solve for the equilibrium level of E and e, and show that Poppy becomes perfectly informed (E = 1) and Aiden puts in zero effort in equilibrium (e = 0). Explain your result, possibly using a diagram of Poppy¡¦s marginal benefit and marginal cost curves. What is Poppy¡¦s expected profit? (b) Now consider the case when the agent Aiden has the formal decision making rights (Delegation or A-formal authority). In this case, if Aiden is informed he will decide on the project if he is informed; if not he will ask Poppy for a recommendation. Again calculate the equilibrium levels of E and e. (c) Consider now the case when Poppy can decide to implement a different timing sequence. Assume now that with sequential efforts first Aiden puts in effort e into finding a good project. If he is informed, Aiden implements the project he likes. If Aiden is uninformed he reveals this to Poppy, who can then decide on the level of her effort E. If Poppy is informed she then implements her preferred project. If she too is uninformed no project is implemented. Draw the extensive form of this game and calculate the effort level Poppy makes in the subgame when the Agent is uninformed. Now calculate the effort that Aiden puts in at the first stage of the game. Calculate the expected profit of Poppy in this sequential game and show that it is equal to (1 ) 1 2 ƒ{ƒÑ ƒÑ ƒy ƒÑ .

ECOS3003 Problem set 1 of 3
Problem set ECOS3003
Due date 14.00 Tuesday 1 April
Please keep your answers brief and concise. Excessively long and irrelevant answers
will be penalised.
1. Considered the following market. Chrome can choose when launching its new
product either to do it LARGE or as NICHE. After Chrome has chosen its action,
Firefox observes Chrome¡¦s choice and then can choose to ADAPT to RETAIN its
own product. After Firefox has chosen its action, the game ends and the payoffs are
made. The payoffs are as follows. If Chrome chooses LARGE and Firefox ADAPT,
the payoffs are 25 and 40 to Chrome and Firefox, respectively. If Chrome goes
LARGE and Firefox RETAINS the payoffs are 30 and 50 to Chrome and Firefox. If
Chrome plays NICHE and Firefox ADAPTS, the payoffs are (40 Chrome, 30 Firefox)
and if Chrome plays NICHE and Firefox RETAINS the payoffs are (20, 20) for
Chrome and Firefox, respectively.
a. What is a Nash equilibrium? Outline the Nash equilibrium or equilibria in the
game, and explain your answer.
b. What is a subgame perfect equilibrium and how would you find such an
equilibrium? What is outcome in the the subgame perfect equilibrium in this game?
Explain your answer.
c. Does the subgame perfect equilibrium equilibrium result in the outcome that
maximises total surplus? If it is, explain why. If not, is there any way the surplusmaximising
outcome can be obtained? Interpret your answer in the context of the
Coase Theorem. Why might your solution not work?
2. Two workers (workers 1 and 2) on a production line both have the choice to come
to work Late or Early. If both come Late their payoffs are 5 and 4 to worker 1 and 2,
respectively. If worker 1 comes Late and worker 2 comes Early the payoffs are 2 to
each worker. If worker 1 comes Early and 2 comes Late the payoffs are 1 to each of
them. Finally, if both workers come Early the payoffs are 3 to each worker.
Draw the normal form of this game and determine all of the Nash equilibria. Do you
think this game could represent a true production process?
3. Consider the following delegation versus centralisation model of decision making,
loosely based on some of the discussion in class.
A principal wishes to implement a decision that has to be a number between 0 and 1;
that is, a decision d needs to be implemented where 0 „T d „T1. The difficulty for the
principal is that she does not know what decision is appropriate given the current state
of the economy, but she would like to implement a decision that exactly equals what
ECOS3003 Problem set 2 of 3
is required given the state of the economy. In other words, if the economy is in state s
(where 0 „T s „T1) the principal would like to implement a decision d = s as the
principal¡¦s utility Up (or loss from the maximum possible profit) is given by
P U ƒ­ ƒ{ s ƒ{ d . With such a utility function, maximising utility really means making
the loss as small as possible. For simplicity, the two possible levels of s are 0.4 and
0.7, and each occurs with probability 0.5.
There are two division managers A and B who each have their own biases. Manager
A always wants a decision of 0.4 to be implemented, and incurs a disutility UA that is
increasing the further from 0.4 the decision d that is actually implement, specifically,
0.4 A U ƒ­ ƒ{ ƒ{ d . Similarly, Manager B always wants a decision of 0.7 to be
implement, and incurs a disutility UB that is (linearly) increasing in the distance
between 0.7 and the actually decision that is implemented – that is 0.7 B U ƒ­ ƒ{ ƒ{ d .
Each manager is completely informed, so that each of them knows exactly what the
state of the economy s is.
(a) The principal can opt to centralise the decision but before making her decision ¡V
given she does not know what the state of the economy is ¡V she asks for
recommendations from her two division managers. Centralisation means that the
principal commits to implement a decision that is the average of the two
recommendations she received from her managers. The recommendations are sent
simultaneously and cannot be less than 0 or greater than 1.
Assume that the state of the economy s = 0.7. What is the report (or recommendation)
that Manager A will send if Manager B always truthfully reports s?
(b) Again the principal is going to centralise the decision and will ask for a
recommendation from both managers, as in the previous question. Now, however,
assume that both managers strategically make their recommendations. What are the
recommendations rA and rB made by the Managers A and B, respectively, in a Nash
equilibrium?
(c) What is the principal¡¦s expected utility (or loss) under centralised decision making
(as in part b)?
(d) Can you design a contract for both of the managers that can help the principal
implement their preferred option? Why might this contract be problematic in the real
world?
4. Consider a variant on the Aghion and Tirole (1997) model. Poppy, the principal,
and Aiden, the agent, together can decide on implementing a new project, but both are
unsure of which project is good and which is really bad. Given this, if no one is
informed they will not do any project and both parties get zero. Both Poppy and
Aiden can, however, put effort into discovering a good project. Poppy can put in
effort E; this costs her effort cost 1 2
2
E , but it gives her a probability of being
ECOS3003 Problem set 3 of 3
informed of E. If Poppy gets her preferred project she will get a payoff of $1. For all
other projects Poppy gets zero. Similarly, the agent Aiden can put in effort e at a cost
of 1 2
2
e ; this gives Aiden a probability of being informed with probability e. If Aiden
gets his preferred project he gets $1. For all other projects he gets zero. Note also, that
the probability that Poppy¡¦s preferred project is also Aiden¡¦s preferred project is £\
(this is the degree of congruence is £\). It is also the case that £\ if Aiden chooses his
preferred project that it will also be the preferred project of Poppy. (Note, in this
question, we assume that £\ = £] from the standard model studied in class.)
(a) Assume that Poppy has the legal right to decide (P-formal authority). If Poppy is
uninformed she will ask the agent for a recommendation; if Aiden is informed he will
recommend a project to implement. First consider the case when both Aiden and
Poppy simultaneously choose their effort costs. Write out the utility or profit function
for both Poppy and Aiden. Solve for the equilibrium level of E and e, and show that
Poppy becomes perfectly informed (E = 1) and Aiden puts in zero effort in
equilibrium (e = 0). Explain your result, possibly using a diagram of Poppy¡¦s
marginal benefit and marginal cost curves. What is Poppy¡¦s expected profit?
(b) Now consider the case when the agent Aiden has the formal decision making
rights (Delegation or A-formal authority). In this case, if Aiden is informed he will
decide on the project if he is informed; if not he will ask Poppy for a
recommendation. Again calculate the equilibrium levels of E and e.
(c) Consider now the case when Poppy can decide to implement a different timing
sequence. Assume now that with sequential efforts first Aiden puts in effort e into
finding a good project. If he is informed, Aiden implements the project he likes. If
Aiden is uninformed he reveals this to Poppy, who can then decide on the level of her
effort E. If Poppy is informed she then implements her preferred project. If she too is
uninformed no project is implemented.
Draw the extensive form of this game and calculate the effort level Poppy makes in
the subgame when the Agent is uninformed. Now calculate the effort that Aiden puts
in at the first stage of the game. Calculate the expected profit of Poppy in this
sequential game and show that it is equal to (1 ) 1
2
ƒ{ƒÑ ƒÑ ƒy ƒÑ .

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Final Project Ratio Analysis Memo Select a well-known organization as the basis for this assignment. It would be good if it was an organization you may have had some experience with – be sure it is an organization that sells inventory rather than one that just provides a service. Access the organization’s annual report (Google the organization like this: Best Buy Annual Report) and find in the report the organization’s balance sheet and income statement. Most of the time annual reports are located in the organization’s “Investor Relations” section of their website. Use these statements to calculate the following: I. Liquidity ratios •Current ratio •Acid-test, or quick, ratio •Receivables turnover •Inventory turnover II. Profitability ratios •Asset turnover •Profit margin •Return on assets •Return on common stockholders’ equity III. Solvency ratios •Debt to total assets •Times interest earned Show your calculations for each ratio. Create a horizontal and vertical analysis for the balance sheet and the income statement. Write a 350- to 700-word memo to the CEO of your selected organization in which you discuss your findings from your ratio calculations and your horizontal and vertical analysis. In your memo, address the following questions: · What do the liquidity, profitability, and solvency ratios reveal about the financial position of the company? · Which users may be interested in each type of ratio? · What does the collected data reveal about the performance and position of the company? Format your memo consistent with APA guidelines.

Final Project

Ratio Analysis Memo

Select a well-known organization as the basis for this assignment. It would be good if it was an organization you may have had some experience with – be sure it is an organization that sells inventory rather than one that just provides a service.

Access the organization’s annual report (Google the organization like this: Best Buy Annual Report) and find in the report the organization’s balance sheet and income statement. Most of the time annual reports are located in the organization’s “Investor Relations” section of their website. Use these statements to calculate the following:

I. Liquidity ratios

•Current ratio
•Acid-test, or quick, ratio
•Receivables turnover
•Inventory turnover
II. Profitability ratios

•Asset turnover
•Profit margin
•Return on assets
•Return on common stockholders’ equity
III. Solvency ratios

•Debt to total assets
•Times interest earned
Show your calculations for each ratio.

Create a horizontal and vertical analysis for the balance sheet and the income statement.

Write a 350- to 700-word memo to the CEO of your selected organization in which you discuss your findings from your ratio calculations and your horizontal and vertical analysis. In your memo, address the following questions:

· What do the liquidity, profitability, and solvency ratios reveal about the financial position of the company?

· Which users may be interested in each type of ratio?

· What does the collected data reveal about the performance and position of the company?

Format your memo consistent with APA guidelines.

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1. Critically evaluate the key organisational development issues emerging in the P&G case study. 2. Critically discuss the concepts of organisational culture, structure and leadership as presented in the Case Study outlining the merits and limitations of these concepts in action at P&G. presentation should incorporate the basis of your evaluation in the light of the case and discussions should be supported with critical engagement with theory. You should utilise the concepts, frameworks and theoretical principles we have discussed in the sessions to critically evaluate the case study material

1. Critically evaluate the key organisational development issues emerging in the P&G case study.

2. Critically discuss the concepts of organisational culture, structure and leadership as presented in the Case Study outlining the merits and limitations of these concepts in action at P&G.

 presentation should incorporate the basis of your evaluation in the light of the case and discussions should be supported with critical engagement with theory.

You should utilise the concepts, frameworks and theoretical principles we have discussed in the sessions to critically evaluate the case study material

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You must submit two copies of the assignment as follows: 1. ONE electronic copy submitted via Moodle. 2. ONE hard copy to be submitted at the Management Reception. The timely submission of assignments is your responsibility, and excuses — such as finding a long queue in the Computer Centre to print out — will not be accepted. You will receive an electronic submission receipt ID via email. It is your responsibility to keep this safe as proof of submission. You are also strongly recommended to keep a copy of all submitted assignments. Preview Your school district wants to evaluate teachers based on their students’ scores on standardized tests. In this case, you will use Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel to create the evaluation system. Background Your state’s education officials complain that virtually all the teachers in your school district are rated as good or excellent by their school principals. There are surely bad teachers, state officials say, but they are not identified and the problem is not addressed. Therefore, the public school district has been instructed by state education officials to devise an accountability system to identify good teachers and bad teachers. Good teachers would be paid more. Bad teachers would be retrained so that they improve, or they would be fired. Fired teachers then would be replaced by good teachers. In this way, officials believe that teaching would improve and students would learn more. In the new system, subjective evaluations by school principals will not be the only measure of teacher success. In addition to principal evaluations, an objective method is needed to measure teacher performance. Your state’s standardized tests are considered a reliable measure of student learning, which means that the test scores could be used to help measure teacher performance objectively. According to some state officials, teachers whose students do well on the tests are doing a good job; poor test scores must be a sign of bad teaching. The concept of matching teacher performance with student performance is highly controversial. In your state, public school begins with kindergarten. Starting in first grade, elementary students take a standardized test at the end of each school year. The test has a reading section and a math section; the summary score ranges from 0 to 1000. These standardized tests are given for grades 1 through 8; the test becomes more difficult and comprehensive each school year. Your district superintendent thinks that parental involvement is a key factor in a student’s motivation and learning. The superintendent wants parents to supervise their children’s homework, meet regularly with teachers, and be involved with the school. The superintendent thinks that children of “involved” parents usually do better in school. In your district, K-8 teachers are required to note the extent of parental involvement, and to report this information as a rating to the principal and the superintendent. Teachers are required to document these ratings by recording missed meetings, missed homework assignments, and so on. District officials think the ratings are reliable because they are documented and are rarely debated by parents. You have been asked to develop an accountability system that incorporates standardized test scores and parental involvement ratings. Your model will be a prototype. The model will use test score data for all second-grade students in the district. To develop a sample group for comparison, you have identified three second-grade classes in a district school. You have two years of data for students in these classes. An Access database file named TeacherEval.accdb contains your data. Use Windows Explorer to copy the TeacherEval.accdb database, which is in the MN1505 subfolder within the Management folder on the pclabs (\\ourdata\teaching) (R:) drive, to your Y: drive. [If your Y: drive is full you may need to delete some of its contents to be able to do this]. The tables in the file are discussed next. Figure 1 shows the first few records of the Year1Students table. Figure 1 Year1Students table records The table shows each student’s ID number and indicates whether parents are involved in the student’s education. Each second-grader in the district is assigned a unique student number. A lack of parental involvement is indicated by the text value “YES” in the LackOflnvolvement? field. If the parents are involved, the entry is “NO.” The district had 548 second-grade students in Year 1 of your model. A companion table called Year2Students holds data for second-grade students in Year 2 of your model. The two tables contain two different sets of students. By sheer coincidence, Years 1 and 2 had the same number of second-grade students, 548. Your model will also include two years of student records for three second-grade teachers in a particular district school. The teachers are named Smith, Jones, and Casey. Figure 2 shows the first few records of the Year1ClassAssignments table. Figure 2 Year1ClassAssignments table records The three teachers each had 23 students in their second-grade class each year. Each teacher’s class has a unique number. Here, teacher Smith’s Year 1 class was number 1. The table shows how individual students were assigned to each class. Each student is given a unique number, which is the table’s key field. Figure 2 shows that teacher Smith had students 1, 2, and 10 among the 23 assigned to her. Teacher Casey’s class of 23 included student 5. In your district, most students attend the school in their neighbourhood. Occasionally, parents request that their child attend a school other than their neighbourhood school, but such requests are not always honoured. Within a school, the principal assigns students to a teacher; the teachers are not allowed to request particular students. A companion table called Year2ClassAssignments shows how students in Year 2 were assigned to the same second-grade classes used for Year 1. No students were “kept back” at the end of Year 1, so no Year 1 students reappear in a teacher’s class in Year 2. Each second-grade student in the district took standardized tests at the end of first grade, and again at the end of second grade. Scores for Year 1 students are summarized in the table Year1StudentTestScores. The first few records of the table are shown in Figure 3. Figure 3 Year1StudentTestScores table records Student l’s scores on the two year-end tests were 453 and 456. Each year’s test emphasizes maths and reading, and each succeeding test is more comprehensive and more difficult. Thus, Student 1 did not appear to progress greatly in second grade. Student 2’s second-grade score appears to represent a decline in ability. Student 3’s second-grade test score shows improvement over Year I , although the scores are not high in either year. The YearlStudentTestScores table has 548 records, one for each Year 1 student. A companion table, Year2StudentTestScores, contains records in the same format for second-grade students in Year 2 of the model. Your model will use two criteria for assessing teacher performance. 1. Criterion 1: The average test score is computed for a second-grade class taught by one of the sample group teachers. The average test score is also computed for all second-grade students in the district. If the sample teacher’s class average is higher than the district average, the teacher is rated “good” for the year; otherwise, the teacher receives a “poor” rating for the year. 2. Criterion 2: Each student has a first-grade test score and a second-grade test score. The average test score improvement is computed for the sample teacher’s class and for all second-grade students in the district. If the teacher’s class has a better average improvement than the district’s, the teacher is rated “good” for the year; otherwise, the teacher receives a “poor” rating for the year. For example, if a teacher’s class had an average first-grade test score of 460 and an average second-grade test score of 474, the average improvement of the class is 3% (1.03 * 460 = 474). If the average district student showed a 2.5% improvement from the first-grade test to the second-grade test, the teacher would receive a “good” rating for the year. You want to see if the two criteria produce the same ratings for a teacher in a year and if a criterion produces the same rating for a teacher two years in a row. TASK 1: MAKING QUERIES IN ACCESS In this task, you will design and run four queries in Access. Year 1 Test Scores for All District Students Create a query whose output shows Year 1 test scores for all second-grade students in the district. Your output should look like that in Figure 4. The query should generate 548 output records, although only the first few are shown. Name the query Year1ScoresForDistrict. Figure 4 Year 1 scores for all second-grade students in the district You should also create a query for Year 2 test scores of all second-grade students in the district. The output format is the same. Year 1 Test Scores for Students in Sample School Create a query whose output shows Year 1 test scores for all second-grade students in the sample school. The query should generate 69 records for the three teachers in your model. Your output should look like that in Figure 5; only the first few output records are shown. Name the query Year1TestScoresForSchool. Figure 5 Year 1 scores for second-grade students in sample school You should also create a query for Year 2 test scores of all second-grade students in the sample school. The output format is the same. When you finish the queries, save and close the TeacherEval.accdb file. TASK 2: USING EXCEL FOR DECISION SUPPORT In this task, you will import the output of the four Access queries into Excel worksheets and then develop information needed to rank the three teachers. Importing Query Data Open a new file in Excel and save it as TeacherEval.xlsx. Import the YearlScoresForDistrict query output into Excel. Click the Data tab and then click From Access in the Get External Data group. Specify the Access filename, the query name, and where to place the data in Excel (cell A1 is recommended). The data will be imported into Excel as an Excel data table, which is the format you want. If cell A1 is not already selected, click it. In the Table Style Options group, select Total Row to add a Totals row to the bottom of the table. Rename the worksheet YearlScoresForDistrict. The first few rows of your worksheet should look like Figure 6. Figure 6 Rows in the Year1ScoresForDistrict worksheet Import the Year2ScoresForDistrict query output into another worksheet. Add a Totals row and name the worksheet Year2ScoresForDistrict. Import the YearlTestScoresForSchool query output into a third worksheet. Add a Totals row and name the worksheet YearlScoresForSchool. The first few rows of your worksheet should look like Figure 7. Figure 7 Rows in the Year1ScoresForSchool worksheet Finally, import the Year2TestScoresForSchool query output into a fourth worksheet. Add a Totals row and name the worksheet Year2ScoresForSchool. Using Data Tables to Gather Data You will use the data tables to gather data needed to evaluate teacher performance for the two years. You could also use pivot tables to gather the data; your instructor may require them instead. However, data tables are probably more convenient in this case. Before gathering data, you need a worksheet in which to manually enter data that you develop. Create a new worksheet named Summary. You can use any format that lets you compare one value to another. For example, the format shown in Figure 8 is acceptable. Figure 8 Possible summary worksheet format Most data for the summary worksheet will come from the data tables. Data in the Improvement column would be determined by an Excel formula in which one cell value is divided by another. The Criteria cells should include an explanatory comment; to enter one, right-click in the cell and click Insert Comment. The bottom section, “Lacks Involvement-Yes”, records counts of students whose parents lacked involvement in each teacher’s classes during the two years. For example, Smith might have had 8 uninvolved parents in Year 1 and 12 in Year 2. You should now gather data for the sample teachers’ classes and for the district, using the four data tables. As data is gathered, enter the values manually into your summary sheet. Keep the following points in mind: • Click the arrow in the Totals row to select summary values for a column’s data, such as average, or counts. • Column headings also have arrows. You can stratify data in a column by clicking a value on or off. For example, suppose that your worksheet showed people’s heights and gender. You could click to hide information for males, leaving just female data. Then you could use the Totals row to determine the average height for females. To restore the male data, you would click the heading arrow and then click Select All. Fill in the Criteria cells after inspecting the data. Then consider the following eight questions: 1. What is the impact of parental involvement? Is it true that children of involved parents do better academically in this school district? 2. Using Criterion 1, are any teachers rated as good in one year but poor in the other? If so, does seem reasonable that a teacher’s ability changes from year to year? How can these rating changes be explained? 3. Using Criterion 1, does it appear that any teachers are classified incorrectly? In other words, are any teachers considered good when they actually are poor, or vice versa? 4. Is Criterion 1 a reasonable way to assess teacher ability? Why or why not? 5. Using Criterion 2, are any teachers rated as good in one year but poor in the other? If so, does seem reasonable that a teacher’s ability changes from year to year? How can these rating changes be explained? 6. Using Criterion 2, does it appear that any teachers are classified incorrectly? In other words, are any teachers considered good when they actually are poor, or vice versa? 7. Is Criterion 2 a reasonable way to assess teacher ability? Why or why not? 8. Based on the data, how would you describe the abilities of each teacher? TASK 3: DOCUMENTING FINDINGS IN A MEMORANDUM In this task, you write a memorandum in Microsoft Word that documents your findings. Your memo needs tables that show teacher ratings by the two criteria for each year. The format of the tables is shown in Figure 9; you will also need a table for Year 2. Teacher Year1 Rating by Criterion 1 Year 1 Rating by Criterion 2 Smith Jones Casey Figure 9 Format of table to include in memo In your memo, observe the following requirements: • Your memo should have proper headings, such as Date, To, From, and Subject. You can address the memo to the district superintendent. • Briefly outline the situation. However, you need not provide much background — you can assume that readers are generally familiar with your task — but you need to show that you have understood the situation and what is required of you. • In the body of the memo, briefly describe the model you created. Be sure to state the two accountability criteria. List the ratings given to the three teachers, and refer to the tables that summarize the ratings. • List the answers to the eight questions using appropriate data to support them. Then state your opinion of measuring teacher accountability by standardized test scores. If the method has problems, how do you think the problems can be minimized? • The memorandum should be between 1000 and 1500 words in length. MARKING CRITERIA The submitted and assessed part of this coursework is a business-style memorandum, rather than an academic essay. Thus, the marking criteria are different from those usually required for an academic essay. Your assignment will be assessed on the following criteria: • Fulfilling the requirements of the brief • Use of data/charts to support statements made • Writing style • Quality of presentation I do not expect you to use in-text references nor to provide a bibliography/reference list at the end of the memorandum. TO BE SUBMITTED 1. Your memorandum (printed copy and electronic submission via Moodle). It is this memorandum on which your mark will be based. 2. CD or USB stick which should contain your Excel spreadsheet file, and your Access database file (single copy only, do not submit these via JISC). These are submitted to prove that you have carried out the Access and Excel work yourself. They will only be reviewed if it is necessary to rule out plagiarism. Please ensure that your disk/stick is clearly labelled with your Student ID number and that it and your printed report are placed in an envelope or folder so that they stay together and can be returned to you.

 

You must submit two copies of the assignment as follows:

  1. ONE electronic copy submitted via Moodle.
  2. ONE hard copy to be submitted at the Management Reception.

The timely submission of assignments is your responsibility, and excuses — such as finding a long queue in the Computer Centre to print out — will not be accepted.   You will receive an electronic submission receipt ID via email.  It is your responsibility to keep this safe as proof of submission.  You are also strongly recommended to keep a copy of all submitted assignments.

 

Preview

Your school district wants to evaluate teachers based on their students’ scores on standardized tests. In this case, you will use Microsoft Access and Microsoft Excel to create the evaluation system.

Background

Your state’s education officials complain that virtually all the teachers in your school district are rated as good or excellent by their school principals. There are surely bad teachers, state officials say, but they are not identified and the problem is not addressed.

Therefore, the public school district has been instructed by state education officials to devise an accountability system to identify good teachers and bad teachers. Good teachers would be paid more. Bad teachers would be retrained so that they improve, or they would be fired. Fired teachers then would be replaced by good teachers. In this way, officials believe that teaching would improve and students would learn more.

In the new system, subjective evaluations by school principals will not be the only measure of teacher success. In addition to principal evaluations, an objective method is needed to measure teacher performance. Your state’s standardized tests are considered a reliable measure of student learning, which means that the test scores could be used to help measure teacher performance objectively. According to some state officials, teachers whose students do well on the tests are doing a good job; poor test scores must be a sign of bad teaching. The concept of matching teacher performance with student performance is highly controversial.

In your state, public school begins with kindergarten. Starting in first grade, elementary students take a standardized test at the end of each school year. The test has a reading section and a math section; the summary score ranges from 0 to 1000. These standardized tests are given for grades 1 through 8; the test becomes more difficult and comprehensive each school year.

Your district superintendent thinks that parental involvement is a key factor in a student’s motivation and learning. The superintendent wants parents to supervise their children’s homework, meet regularly with teachers, and be involved with the school. The superintendent thinks that children of “involved” parents usually do better in school. In your district, K-8 teachers are required to note the extent of parental involvement, and to report this information as a rating to the principal and the superintendent. Teachers are required to document these ratings by recording missed meetings, missed homework assignments, and so on. District officials think the ratings are reliable because they are documented and are rarely debated by parents.

You have been asked to develop an accountability system that incorporates standardized test scores and parental involvement ratings. Your model will be a prototype. The model will use test score data for all second-grade students in the district. To develop a sample group for comparison, you have identified three second-grade classes in a district school. You have two years of data for students in these classes.

An Access database file named TeacherEval.accdb contains your data. Use Windows Explorer to copy the TeacherEval.accdb database, which is in the MN1505 subfolder within the Management folder on the pclabs  (\\ourdata\teaching) (R:) drive, to your Y: drive.  [If your Y: drive is full you may need to delete some of its contents to be able to do this].

The tables in the file are discussed next. Figure 1 shows the first few records of the Year1Students table.

 

 

Figure 1 Year1Students table records

 

The table shows each student’s ID number and indicates whether parents are involved in the student’s education. Each second-grader in the district is assigned a unique student number. A lack of parental involvement is indicated by the text value “YES” in the LackOflnvolvement? field. If the parents are involved, the entry is “NO.”

The district had 548 second-grade students in Year 1 of your model. A companion table called Year2Students holds data for second-grade students in Year 2 of your model. The two tables contain two different sets of students. By sheer coincidence, Years 1 and 2 had the same number of second-grade students, 548.

Your model will also include two years of student records for three second-grade teachers in a particular district school. The teachers are named Smith, Jones, and Casey. Figure 2 shows the first few records of the Year1ClassAssignments table.

 

 

Figure 2 Year1ClassAssignments table records

 

The three teachers each had 23 students in their second-grade class each year. Each teacher’s class has a unique number. Here, teacher Smith’s Year 1 class was number 1. The table shows how individual students were assigned to each class. Each student is given a unique number, which is the table’s key field.

Figure 2 shows that teacher Smith had students 1, 2, and 10 among the 23 assigned to her. Teacher Casey’s class of 23 included student 5.

In your district, most students attend the school in their neighbourhood. Occasionally, parents request that their child attend a school other than their neighbourhood school, but such requests are not always honoured. Within a school, the principal assigns students to a teacher; the teachers are not allowed to request particular students.

A companion table called Year2ClassAssignments shows how students in Year 2 were assigned to the same second-grade classes used for Year 1. No students were “kept back” at the end of Year 1, so no Year 1 students reappear in a teacher’s class in Year 2.

Each second-grade student in the district took standardized tests at the end of first grade, and again at the end of second grade. Scores for Year 1 students are summarized in the table Year1StudentTestScores.

The first few records of the table are shown in Figure 3.

 

 

Figure 3 Year1StudentTestScores table records

 

Student l’s scores on the two year-end tests were 453 and 456. Each year’s test emphasizes maths and reading, and each succeeding test is more comprehensive and more difficult. Thus, Student 1 did not appear to progress greatly in second grade. Student 2’s second-grade score appears to represent a decline in ability. Student 3’s second-grade test score shows improvement over Year I , although the scores are not high in either year.

The YearlStudentTestScores table has 548 records, one for each Year 1 student. A companion table, Year2StudentTestScores, contains records in the same format for second-grade students in Year 2 of the model.

Your model will use two criteria for assessing teacher performance.

  1. Criterion 1: The average test score is computed for a second-grade class taught by one of the sample group teachers. The average test score is also computed for all second-grade students in the district. If the sample teacher’s class average is higher than the district average, the teacher is rated “good” for the year; otherwise, the teacher receives a “poor” rating for the year.
  2. Criterion 2: Each student has a first-grade test score and a second-grade test score. The average test score improvement is computed for the sample teacher’s class and for all second-grade students in the district. If the teacher’s class has a better average improvement than the district’s, the teacher is rated “good” for the year; otherwise, the teacher receives a “poor” rating for the year. For example, if a teacher’s class had an average first-grade test score of 460 and an average second-grade test score of 474, the average improvement of the class is 3% (1.03 * 460 = 474). If the average district student showed a 2.5% improvement from the first-grade test to the second-grade test, the teacher would receive a “good” rating for the year.

You want to see if the two criteria produce the same ratings for a teacher in a year and if a criterion produces the same rating for a teacher two years in a row.

TASK 1: MAKING QUERIES IN ACCESS

In this task, you will design and run four queries in Access.

Year 1 Test Scores for All District Students

Create a query whose output shows Year 1 test scores for all second-grade students in the district. Your output should look like that in Figure 4. The query should generate 548 output records, although only the first few are shown. Name the query Year1ScoresForDistrict.

 

Figure 4 Year 1 scores for all second-grade students in the district

 

You should also create a query for Year 2 test scores of all second-grade students in the district. The output format is the same.

Year 1 Test Scores for Students in Sample School

Create a query whose output shows Year 1 test scores for all second-grade students in the sample school. The query should generate 69 records for the three teachers in your model. Your output should look like that in Figure 5; only the first few output records are shown. Name the query Year1TestScoresForSchool.

 

Figure 5 Year 1 scores for second-grade students in sample school

 

You should also create a query for Year 2 test scores of all second-grade students in the sample school. The output format is the same.

When you finish the queries, save and close the TeacherEval.accdb file.

TASK 2: USING EXCEL FOR DECISION SUPPORT

In this task, you will import the output of the four Access queries into Excel worksheets and then develop information needed to rank the three teachers.

Importing Query Data

Open a new file in Excel and save it as TeacherEval.xlsx.

Import the YearlScoresForDistrict query output into Excel. Click the Data tab and then click From Access in the Get External Data group. Specify the Access filename, the query name, and where to place the data in Excel (cell A1 is recommended).

The data will be imported into Excel as an Excel data table, which is the format you want. If cell A1 is not already selected, click it. In the Table Style Options group, select Total Row to add a Totals row to the bottom of the table. Rename the worksheet YearlScoresForDistrict. The first few rows of your worksheet should look like Figure 6.

 

 

Figure 6 Rows in the Year1ScoresForDistrict worksheet

 

Import the Year2ScoresForDistrict query output into another worksheet. Add a Totals row and name the worksheet Year2ScoresForDistrict.

Import the YearlTestScoresForSchool query output into a third worksheet. Add a Totals row and name the worksheet YearlScoresForSchool. The first few rows of your worksheet should look like Figure 7.

 

 

Figure 7 Rows in the Year1ScoresForSchool worksheet

Finally, import the Year2TestScoresForSchool query output into a fourth worksheet. Add a Totals row and name the worksheet Year2ScoresForSchool.

Using Data Tables to Gather Data

You will use the data tables to gather data needed to evaluate teacher performance for the two years. You could also use pivot tables to gather the data; your instructor may require them instead. However, data tables are probably more convenient in this case.

Before gathering data, you need a worksheet in which to manually enter data that you develop. Create a new worksheet named Summary. You can use any format that lets you compare one value to another. For example, the format shown in Figure 8 is acceptable.

 

Figure 8 Possible summary worksheet format

 

Most data for the summary worksheet will come from the data tables. Data in the Improvement column would be determined by an Excel formula in which one cell value is divided by another. The Criteria cells should include an explanatory comment; to enter one, right-click in the cell and click Insert Comment. The bottom section, “Lacks Involvement-Yes”, records counts of students whose parents lacked involvement in each teacher’s classes during the two years. For example, Smith might have had 8 uninvolved parents in Year 1 and 12 in Year 2.

You should now gather data for the sample teachers’ classes and for the district, using the four data tables. As data is gathered, enter the values manually into your summary sheet. Keep the following points in mind:

  • Click the arrow in the Totals row to select summary values for a column’s data, such as average, or counts.
  • Column headings also have arrows. You can stratify data in a column by clicking a value on or off. For example, suppose that your worksheet showed people’s heights and gender. You could click to hide information for males, leaving just female data. Then you could use the Totals row to determine the average height for females. To restore the male data, you would click the heading arrow and then click Select All.

Fill in the Criteria cells after inspecting the data. Then consider the following eight questions:

  1. What is the impact of parental involvement? Is it true that children of involved parents do better academically in this school district?
  2. Using Criterion 1, are any teachers rated as good in one year but poor in the other? If so, does seem reasonable that a teacher’s ability changes from year to year? How can these rating changes be explained?
  3. Using Criterion 1, does it appear that any teachers are classified incorrectly? In other words, are any teachers considered good when they actually are poor, or vice versa?
  4. Is Criterion 1 a reasonable way to assess teacher ability? Why or why not?
  5. Using Criterion 2, are any teachers rated as good in one year but poor in the other? If so, does seem reasonable that a teacher’s ability changes from year to year? How can these rating changes be explained?
  6.  Using Criterion 2, does it appear that any teachers are classified incorrectly? In other words, are any teachers considered good when they actually are poor, or vice versa?
  7. Is Criterion 2 a reasonable way to assess teacher ability? Why or why not?
  8. Based on the data, how would you describe the abilities of each teacher?

TASK 3: DOCUMENTING FINDINGS IN A MEMORANDUM

In this task, you write a memorandum in Microsoft Word that documents your findings. Your memo needs tables that show teacher ratings by the two criteria for each year. The format of the tables is shown in Figure 9; you will also need a table for Year 2.

 

Teacher Year1 Rating by Criterion 1 Year 1 Rating by Criterion 2
Smith    
Jones    
Casey    

Figure 9 Format of table to include in memo

 

In your memo, observe the following requirements:

  • Your memo should have proper headings, such as Date, To, From, and Subject. You can address the memo to the district superintendent.
  • Briefly outline the situation. However, you need not provide much background — you can assume that readers are generally familiar with your task — but you need to show that you have understood the situation and what is required of you.
  • In the body of the memo, briefly describe the model you created. Be sure to state the two accountability criteria. List the ratings given to the three teachers, and refer to the tables that summarize the ratings.
  • List the answers to the eight questions using appropriate data to support them. Then state your opinion of measuring teacher accountability by standardized test scores. If the method has problems, how do you think the problems can be minimized?
  • The memorandum should be between 1000 and 1500 words in length.

MARKING CRITERIA

The submitted and assessed part of this coursework is a business-style memorandum, rather than an academic essay.  Thus, the marking criteria are different from those usually required for an academic essay.  Your assignment will be assessed on the following criteria:

  • Fulfilling the requirements of the brief
  • Use of data/charts to support statements made
  • Writing style
  • Quality of presentation

 

I do not expect you to use in-text references nor to provide a bibliography/reference list at the end of the memorandum.

TO BE SUBMITTED

  1. Your memorandum (printed copy and electronic submission via Moodle).  It is this memorandum on which your mark will be based.
  2. CD or USB stick which should contain your Excel spreadsheet file, and your Access database file (single copy only, do not submit these via JISC).  These are submitted to prove that you have carried out the Access and Excel work yourself.  They will only be reviewed if it is necessary to rule out plagiarism.

 

Please ensure that your disk/stick is clearly labelled with your Student ID number and that it and your printed report are placed in an envelope or folder so that they stay together and can be returned to you.

 

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